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Can a 19 year old get a colonoscopy?

Can a 19 year old get a colonoscopy?

Traditionally, colonoscopies are for adults over the age of 50, but young adults may also need this procedure as well. It is never a bad idea to consult a gastroenterologist and ask for one if you are experiencing symptoms that concern you.

Should I get a colonoscopy at 19?

“For a young adult, a colonoscopy isn’t recommended unless other workups or tests indicate that there’s good reason for a more thorough check of your colon.” Typically, screening colonoscopies begin at age 45 and are done every 10 years.

Why does a doctor order a colonoscopy?

Why it’s done Your doctor may recommend a colonoscopy to: Investigate intestinal signs and symptoms. A colonoscopy can help your doctor explore possible causes of abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, chronic constipation, chronic diarrhea and other intestinal problems. Screen for colon cancer.

Who is 19 year old girl with bowel cancer?

But, Megan is not just like any other 19-year-old, she is vowing in the face of her battle with cancer to raise awareness to prevent others face the same ordeal. A NEW tool that calculates a person’s risk of developing bowel cancer is designed to speed up diagnosis and save young patients’ lives.

Is It Never Too Young to get bowel cancer?

In support of Bowel Cancer UK’s Never Too Young campaign, she is urging medics to think bowel cancer as a potential worst case scenario when a patient, whatever their age, presents with signs of the disease.

How old was Megan when she was told she had bowel cancer?

She thought symptoms were nothing more than growing pains but, the reality was far more serious. After a series of tests, the then 18-year-old was told the pain and constipation she’d been suffering was in fact bowel cancer. The disease is one that most people associate with old men. But, Megan said this attitude needs to change.

How did Megan Pryde find out she had bowel cancer?

WHEN teenager Megan Pryde collapsed at home with stomach pains, doctors feared she was suffering appendicitis. She thought symptoms were nothing more than growing pains but, the reality was far more serious. After a series of tests, the then 18-year-old was told the pain and constipation she’d been suffering was in fact bowel cancer.

But, Megan is not just like any other 19-year-old, she is vowing in the face of her battle with cancer to raise awareness to prevent others face the same ordeal. A NEW tool that calculates a person’s risk of developing bowel cancer is designed to speed up diagnosis and save young patients’ lives.

In support of Bowel Cancer UK’s Never Too Young campaign, she is urging medics to think bowel cancer as a potential worst case scenario when a patient, whatever their age, presents with signs of the disease.

She thought symptoms were nothing more than growing pains but, the reality was far more serious. After a series of tests, the then 18-year-old was told the pain and constipation she’d been suffering was in fact bowel cancer. The disease is one that most people associate with old men. But, Megan said this attitude needs to change.

WHEN teenager Megan Pryde collapsed at home with stomach pains, doctors feared she was suffering appendicitis. She thought symptoms were nothing more than growing pains but, the reality was far more serious. After a series of tests, the then 18-year-old was told the pain and constipation she’d been suffering was in fact bowel cancer.