Users' questions

Can a kidney stone cause atypical urothelial cells?

Can a kidney stone cause atypical urothelial cells?

There is a well-established association between uroli- thiasis and urothelial carcinoma. 1 Kidney and ureteral stones pose an elevated risk of cancer in the renal pelvis, ureter, and bladder. Urolithiasis can cause cytologic atypia, including some atypical features found in urothelial carcinoma.

What does atypical urothelial category mean in urine cytology?

For the last 14 years at McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Canada, we have used diagnostic terminology for urine cytology that includes an atypical urothelial category, representing a gray zone between the benign category (including reactive and instrumentation changes) and the “suspicious” and malignant categories.

What causes abnormal urothelial cells under a microscope?

Atypical urothelial cells look abnormal under a microscope, explains Mayo Clinic. While some cancers cause atypical cells, other factors such as inflammation, infection and age also cause cells to appear abnormal. Doctors monitor abnormal cells to ensure they do not become more abnormal over time.

What causes normal cells to turn into atypical cells?

Many factors can make normal cells appear atypical, including inflammation and infection. Even normal aging can make cells appear abnormal. Atypical cells can change back to normal cells if the underlying cause is removed or resolved. This can happen spontaneously.

What causes urothelial tissue fragments in voided urine?

The presence of urothelial tissue fragments (UTF) in voided urine (VU) is often considered an abnormal finding that may be associated with the presence of urothelial papillary neoplasms.

What happens if you have atypical urothelial cells?

Bladder cancer is the most common form of cancer in this type of cell. Some screening tests show atypical cells when no serious illness is present. False positive results do not necessarily require treatment. Doctors consider the patient’s medical history and risk factors to determine the cause of atypical cells.

Atypical urothelial cells look abnormal under a microscope, explains Mayo Clinic. While some cancers cause atypical cells, other factors such as inflammation, infection and age also cause cells to appear abnormal. Doctors monitor abnormal cells to ensure they do not become more abnormal over time.

Many factors can make normal cells appear atypical, including inflammation and infection. Even normal aging can make cells appear abnormal. Atypical cells can change back to normal cells if the underlying cause is removed or resolved. This can happen spontaneously.