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Can a person lose their sense of smell after a cold?

Can a person lose their sense of smell after a cold?

One can have a total loss of smell—medically called anosmia—or a partial loss of smell, referred to as hyposmia. It can take a while for the sense of smell to come back after a cold or any viral infection in the upper respiratory tract, a condition called “postviral olfactory dysfunction”. In a few rare cases, the loss of smell can be permanent.

Why do we lose our sense of taste during a bad cold?

During a cold, it is the perception of flavor that is compromised. This connection is called the retronasal passage. Consider our pepperoni pizza. Before you take a bite, the familiar waft of bread, cheese and meat tingle the olfactory receptors in the nose.

Why do some people lose their sense of smell?

Others find their smell deteriorating gradually as they age, while still others find that their sense of smell doesn’t return to normal after a cold, a viral infection, or a bout with hay fever. (See “Common Causes of Smell and Taste Disorders” below.)

Why do covid-19 patients lose smell and taste?

(CNN) Loss of smell and taste is more severe in Covid-19 patients than in patients with common colds and that could be due to the effect the coronavirus has on the brain and nervous system, British researchers reported on Wednesday.

One can have a total loss of smell—medically called anosmia—or a partial loss of smell, referred to as hyposmia. It can take a while for the sense of smell to come back after a cold or any viral infection in the upper respiratory tract, a condition called “postviral olfactory dysfunction”. In a few rare cases, the loss of smell can be permanent.

During a cold, it is the perception of flavor that is compromised. This connection is called the retronasal passage. Consider our pepperoni pizza. Before you take a bite, the familiar waft of bread, cheese and meat tingle the olfactory receptors in the nose.

How did I Lose my sense of smell and taste?

Desperate to recover, I’d test my sense of smell frequently by plunging my nose in a jar of coffee. It became a near obsession and I’d cry when, inevitably, I could smell nothing. Then, a few months ago, I went for a run. I got in the car to go home and caught a whiff of something instantly recognisable: dog mess.

(CNN) Loss of smell and taste is more severe in Covid-19 patients than in patients with common colds and that could be due to the effect the coronavirus has on the brain and nervous system, British researchers reported on Wednesday.