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Can cerebral palsy affect your mobility?

Can cerebral palsy affect your mobility?

As a movement disorder, cerebral palsy almost always affects a child’s mobility. Mobility is defined as the ability to move in one’s environment with ease and without restriction. Problems with walking, rolling over in bed or transitioning positions are examples of mobility limitations.

Can cerebral palsy intermittent?

In any manifestation of spastic cerebral palsy, clonus of the affected limb(s) may intermittently result, as well as muscle spasms, each of which results from the pain and/or stress of the tightness experienced, indicating especially hard-working and/or exhausted musculature.

Why does cerebral palsy affect walking?

Tight, stiff, overly toned muscles make controlling movements difficult. If it affects the muscles of the lower body, this type of cerebral palsy also makes walking difficult and causes a jerky, awkward gait. With dyskinetic cerebral palsy a person will struggle with involuntary movements in the muscles.

Can cerebral palsy worsen over time?

CP does not get worse over time, though the exact symptoms can change over a person’s lifetime. All people with CP have problems with movement and posture.

What can be mistaken for cerebral palsy?

Other progressive disorders that are occasionally misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy are metachromatic leukodystrophy, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, and Rett syndrome. These disorders differ from cerebral palsy in that they cause breakdowns in cognitive and behavior skills, not just motor skills.

When is cerebral palsy detected?

CP generally is diagnosed during the first or second year after birth. But if a child’s symptoms are mild, it is sometimes difficult to make a diagnosis until the child is a few years older.

Why do people with cerebral palsy have mobility issues?

Cerebral Palsy and Mobility Issues. Tight, stiff, overly toned muscles make controlling movements difficult. If it affects the muscles of the lower body, this type of cerebral palsy also makes walking difficult and causes a jerky, awkward gait. With dyskinetic cerebral palsy a person will struggle with involuntary movements in the muscles.

What are some examples of cerebral palsy limitations?

Problems with walking, rolling over in bed or transitioning positions are examples of mobility limitations. Children with cerebral palsy have varying degrees of difficulty with movement depending on the type and severity of their condition, as well as the area of the body affected.

How does cerebral palsy affect a child’s lifespan?

While less severe forms of mobility restrictions generally do not affect lifespan, children with severe mobility issues, such as those with quadriplegia, run the risk of a lower survival rate. Although cerebral palsy doesn’t get worse over time, mobility may sometimes decrease as the child gets older due to the following:

Can a child with cerebral palsy walk independently?

Most (about 75%-85%) children with CP have spastic CP. This means that their muscles are stiff, and as a result, their movements can be awkward. Over half (about 50%-60%) of children with CP can walk independently.

Why do people with cerebral palsy have mobility limitations?

Mobility limitations are common among those with cerebral palsy. The type and severity of cerebral palsy and the location of movement problems are factors that affect a patient’s mobility. DID YOU KNOW…

How can a child with cerebral palsy be more mobile?

Cerebral Palsy and Mobility Issues. Cerebral palsy is never curable, but surgery to repair a deformity in the legs, for instance, could help a child walk better and be more mobile and independent. Surgery to lengthen contracted muscles and tendons can also help improve mobility while reducing pain too.

What are the most common issues associated with cerebral palsy?

Mobility is one of the most common issues associated with cerebral palsy. A child with this condition should have the type and extent of mobility issues evaluated and parents should be given options for improving their child’s mobility.

How is the life of a child with cerebral palsy managed?

Most symptoms of cerebral palsy, co-existing conditions and other health concerns can be managed or improved through a combination of medications, physical therapy , occupational therapy and speech therapy. There are also different surgery options and assistive devices available to improve a child’s condition, quality of life and life expectancy.