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Can diabetes make you feel like you have the flu?

Can diabetes make you feel like you have the flu?

At least 25.2 percent of people aged 65 and above have type 2 diabetes in the United States. They may have some or all the classic symptoms of type 2 diabetes. They may also experience one or more of the following: flu-like fatigue, which includes feeling lethargic and chronically weak.

Are diabetics high risk for flu?

People with diabetes (type 1, type 2, or gestational), even when well-managed, are at high risk of serious flu complications, which can result in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications.

What are the symptoms of the flu for people with diabetes?

CDC recommends prompt flu treatment for people who have flu infection or suspected flu infection and who are at high risk of serious flu complications, such as people with diabetes. Flu symptoms can include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.

Can a type 2 diabetic get a cold and flu?

Got a Cold or Flu, Plus Diabetes? Colds and flu are no fun, and they can be even worse if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Infections, dehydration, and sugar in some medicines can make it harder to manage your blood sugar. You can take steps to help prevent those problems and stay well. Your best move is to get a flu shot every year.

Is there stigma associated with Type 1 diabetes?

What I refuse to live with, however, is any stigma attached to being diabetic. Dealing with type 1 diabetes (or any type of diabetes is exhausting in many ways, especially when you have to deal with some people’s preconceived notions of the disease. First, I want to clarify what type 1 diabetes really is, as it’s often misunderstood.

What to say to someone with Type 1 diabetes?

Believing that either type of diabetes is a result of simply eating too many donuts or candy bars is offensive and an oversimplification of two very complex diseases. Don’t say: “My friend’s sister’s cousin’s mother-in-law has diabetes, so I totally get what you’re going through.”

Why is diabetes can sometimes look like the flu?

While the most common complications of diabetes, such as heart attack and stroke, can be years in the making, other severe complications can come on suddenly and may even be mistaken for something as commonplace as the flu. Take Deborah, a 57-year-old who didn’t know she had type 2 diabetes, for example.

Is the flu dangerous for people with diabetes?

A dangerous complication of the flu is pneumonia and people with diabetes are more at risk of developing this complication than people without diabetes.

Got a Cold or Flu, Plus Diabetes? Colds and flu are no fun, and they can be even worse if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Infections, dehydration, and sugar in some medicines can make it harder to manage your blood sugar. You can take steps to help prevent those problems and stay well. Your best move is to get a flu shot every year.

What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes?

Watch for diabetes symptoms and get tested if you’re at risk. Symptoms can include urinating a lot (particularly if you have to get up at night to go) or severe thirst, although many people have no symptoms at all. (Ask your doctor is you’re at risk and have your blood sugar tested .)