Users' questions

Can you get Kaposi sarcoma while being undetectable?

Can you get Kaposi sarcoma while being undetectable?

And KS can occasionally occur in people who are taking effective HIV treatment, have an undetectable viral load and have a much higher CD4 count. Cases like this have most often occurred in older men who have had HIV for many years and spent some time in the past with a very low CD4 count.

Do Kaposi sarcoma lesions come and go?

Treatment can usually keep Kaposi’s sarcoma under control for many years. The lesions may shrink and fade, but they might not go away. Overall, almost 75% of people who have KS live at least 5 years after diagnosis.

Which is the most definitive method to diagnose Kaposi sarcoma?

In addition to a physical examination, a biopsy may be used to diagnose Kaposi sarcoma: Biopsy. A biopsy is the removal of a small amount of a small amount of tissue for examination under a microscope. Other tests can suggest that cancer is present, but only a biopsy can make a definite diagnosis.

What does Kaposi sarcoma lesions look like?

Kaposi sarcoma (KS) usually appears first as spots (called lesions) on the skin. The lesions can be purple, red, or brown. KS lesions can be flat and not raised above the surrounding skin (called patches), flat but slightly raised (called plaques), or bumps (called nodules).

How do you test for Kaposi’s sarcoma?

Tests to diagnose internal Kaposi’s sarcoma include:

  1. Fecal occult blood test. This test detects hidden blood in stool, which can be a sign of Kaposi’s sarcoma in the digestive tract.
  2. Chest X-ray. A chest X-ray may reveal abnormalities suggesting Kaposi’s sarcoma in the lung.
  3. Bronchoscopy.
  4. Upper endoscopy.
  5. Colonoscopy.

When do you need a test for Kaposi sarcoma?

Tests for Kaposi Sarcoma. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is often found when a person goes to the doctor because of signs or symptoms they are having. Sometimes KS may be found during a routine physical exam. If KS is suspected, further tests will be needed to confirm the diagnosis.

What kind of cancer does Kaposi’s sarcoma look like?

Kaposi’s sarcoma is a type of cancer that forms in the lining of blood and lymph vessels. The tumors (lesions) of Kaposi’s sarcoma typically appear as painless purplish spots on the legs, feet or face. Lesions can also appear in the genital area, mouth or lymph nodes. In severe Kaposi’s sarcoma, lesions may develop in the digestive tract and lungs.

Why are people with AIDS more likely to get Kaposi’s sarcoma?

Because people with HIV have weakened immune systems — the body’s main line of defense against germs and illnesses — they’re more likely to develop certain cancers, including Kaposi’s sarcoma. Most severe cases happen when someone has AIDS, but skin lesions can show up earlier.

Can a person with Kaposi’s sarcoma stop taking medication?

When possible, people with transplant-related Kaposi’s sarcoma may be able to stop taking immune system-suppressing medication. This allows the immune system to eliminate the cancer in some cases. Switching to a different immunosuppressive medication can also bring improvement. Treatments for small skin lesions include:

Tests for Kaposi Sarcoma. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is often found when a person goes to the doctor because of signs or symptoms they are having. Sometimes KS may be found during a routine physical exam. If KS is suspected, further tests will be needed to confirm the diagnosis.

What kind of cancer does Kaposi’s sarcoma have?

In this Article. Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) is a type of cancer. Tumors with tiny new blood vessels grow below the surface of the skin and in membranes of your mouth, nose, eyes, and anus.

When possible, people with transplant-related Kaposi’s sarcoma may be able to stop taking immune system-suppressing medication. This allows the immune system to eliminate the cancer in some cases. Switching to a different immunosuppressive medication can also bring improvement. Treatments for small skin lesions include:

How is interferon alfa used to treat Kaposi sarcoma?

Another type of drug treatment, called biologic therapy, works by boosting your immune system. Your doctor may prescribe interferon alfa ( Intron A) if your CD4 cell count (a type of white blood cell) is over 200 and you have a fairly healthy immune system.