Tips

Do ADD and bipolar have similar symptoms?

Do ADD and bipolar have similar symptoms?

Several depressive and manic symptoms of bipolar disorder and ADHD symptoms resemble each other in both children and adults. ADHD is far more common than bipolar disorder. (Up to 11 percent of all children in the U.S. have symptoms of ADHD; roughly 60 percent of those children grow up to become adults with ADHD.

Can a person with bipolar disorder have a depressive episode?

Some people with bipolar I disorder may not have depressive episodes. People who have bipolar disorder have wide-ranging symptoms. During the depressive state, they might feel hopeless and deeply sad. They may have thoughts of suicide or self-harm. Mania produces totally opposite symptoms, but can be just as damaging.

Is there a relationship between bipolar disorder and PTSD?

The Relationship Between Bipolar Disorder and PTSD. In addition to being a risk factor for the development of PTSD, traumatic exposure during childhood, such as childhood physical or sexual abuse, may also be risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder.

How often does bipolar disorder and ADHD occur together?

The researchers found that about 1 in 13 adults with ADHD was also diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and 1 in 6 adults with bipolar disorder had ADHD. Why do bipolar disorder and ADHD often occur together?

When is traumatic exposure more likely in bipolar disorder?

Traumatic exposure may be more likely to occur during a manic episode when a person with bipolar disorder is more likely to make risky or impulsive decisions.

Can a temporal lobe epilepsy be related to bipolar?

I also have temporal lobe epilepsy and am bipolar. I take depakote and tegretol, both also used for the treatment of bipolar and use ativan as needed. I am lucky in that the same meds that treat my epilepsy also treat the bipolar and the as needed medicine, the ativan, is also used for both conditions.

Can a person have a manic episode in bipolar I?

In bipolar I disorder, a person has experienced one or more manic episodes. In most cases of bipolar I, episodes of major depression are a central aspect of the overall course of the illness. In bipolar II disorder, hypomanic episodes have been experienced but not manic episodes.

The Relationship Between Bipolar Disorder and PTSD. In addition to being a risk factor for the development of PTSD, traumatic exposure during childhood, such as childhood physical or sexual abuse, may also be risk factors for the development of bipolar disorder.

Traumatic exposure may be more likely to occur during a manic episode when a person with bipolar disorder is more likely to make risky or impulsive decisions.