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Does BPH lead to prostate cancer?

Does BPH lead to prostate cancer?

BPH is not linked to cancer and does not increase your risk of getting prostate cancer—yet the symptoms for BPH and prostate cancer can be similar. Urine flow in a normal (left) and enlarged (right) prostate.

What should my PSA be after heart surgery?

But then there were patients whose PSAs would go from 0.1 after surgery, to 0.15, to 0.19, to 0.21 ng/ml over the course of several years. Their PSA never seemed to translate into anything. Looking at the differences in these cases raised questions in my mind.

How is pretreatment PSA used to determine prognosis?

We can definitely correlate post-treatment relapses with pretreatment PSA velocity, or how quickly the PSA rises. We did a study showing that a pretreatment PSA that increased by more than 2 ng/ml in a year is the strongest predictor that the PSA will double in less than three months after surgery.

What should my PSA be after bone scan?

With some patients, the PSA would be 0.1 after surgery, then 0.5, and then, all of a sudden, 3 ng/ml, and their bone scans would turn positive and their CT scans would light up. But then there were patients whose PSAs would go from 0.1 after surgery, to 0.15, to 0.19, to 0.21 ng/ml over the course of several years.

What does a PSA test mean for prostate cancer?

The advent of PSA screening meant that prostate cancer could be detected at an early stage, perhaps more than a decade before it would cause symptoms. But then what? What did a particular PSA test result mean for an individual patient?

What to do if your PSA comes back after a prostatectomy?

So, first, you need to have the surgery, and only if the PSA levels come back after the prostatectomy, which can happen 5% to 10% of the time, only then radiation should be used as a form of treatment. It is very difficult to have surgery after radiation. Prostate surgery outcomes are usually positive in the hands of an experienced surgeon.

What is the PSA velocity for prostate cancer?

A PSA velocity of 0.75 ng/ml in one year raises the risk that a man is developing prostate cancer. Of concern is men with a rise of 2.0 ng/ml within one year. These men have an increase risk of aggressive prostate cancer that tries to metastasize early to other organs such as the lymph nodes and bones.

Is it possible to have a PSA recurrence after radiation?

Surgery is rarely possible after radiation as primary treatment. For this reason, choosing the right initial treatment for prostate cancer is crucial in your long-term care. Speak to your urologist about your specific risk factors if you have a PSA recurrence and map out the right course of treatment for you.