Users' questions

Does MS pain get worse at night?

Does MS pain get worse at night?

“MS pain that commonly interferes with sleep is neuropathic pain — often described as burning, shooting, searing, or deeply aching. This pain can be relentless and is often worse at night.”

Why is MS so painful?

Neuropathic pain is caused by MS nerve damage in the brain and spinal cord. Nerve damage might cause a range of sensations, from minor irritations to intense sharp or burning pains. Musculoskeletal pain is the pain in muscles and joints that comes from living with the stresses and strains MS places on the body.

Is it possible to have pain with multiple sclerosis?

While neurologists accepted numbness, tingling, itching, and other sensory symptoms as occurring in the MS patient, they often did not recognize pain as part of the spectrum of symptoms of MS. Over the past few years physicians have come to realize that pain is not only possible as a symptom of MS, but that in some patients, pain is a key symptom.

Where does MS pain come from and where does it go?

Still, others may note a crushing or constricting sensation. In terms of location, the MS Hug can be felt anywhere on the torso, from the waist to the shoulders, and it may be localized (in one small area) or encircle the whole body. Also, the pain may come and go or it may be constant and debilitating.

How long does it take for MS pain to subside?

Optic neuritis: Most people with optic neuritis experience pain when moving their eyes. This pain usually subsides after a couple of days, even if vision is still affected. Also called nociceptive pain, this is usually a result of the symptoms of MS, such as spasticity, weakness, immobility or problems walking, and not the disease process itself.

Which is the most common type of pain in MS 2?

Neuropathic pain is the most common kind of pain in MS 2  and is caused by demyelination, which is the loss of the protective sheath that covers nerve fibers. In our body, there are nerve endings called nociceptors that specifically detect painful stimuli.

While neurologists accepted numbness, tingling, itching, and other sensory symptoms as occurring in the MS patient, they often did not recognize pain as part of the spectrum of symptoms of MS. Over the past few years physicians have come to realize that pain is not only possible as a symptom of MS, but that in some patients, pain is a key symptom.

Still, others may note a crushing or constricting sensation. In terms of location, the MS Hug can be felt anywhere on the torso, from the waist to the shoulders, and it may be localized (in one small area) or encircle the whole body. Also, the pain may come and go or it may be constant and debilitating.

Optic neuritis: Most people with optic neuritis experience pain when moving their eyes. This pain usually subsides after a couple of days, even if vision is still affected. Also called nociceptive pain, this is usually a result of the symptoms of MS, such as spasticity, weakness, immobility or problems walking, and not the disease process itself.

How to treat joint and muscle pain in MS?

Some everyday methods you can use to improve symptoms of joint and muscle pain include: In addition, many people do well with physical therapy to help manage stiffness, balance, spasticity, and spasms. A physical therapist can help pinpoint problems with weak or tight muscles that can lead to joint pain in MS.