Popular guidelines

How long does it take for an Odontoid fracture to heal?

How long does it take for an Odontoid fracture to heal?

Most consider a type I odontoid fracture a stable fracture and treat for six to 12 weeks in a rigid cervical orthosis (hard cervical collar).

Is Odontoid fracture stable?

Type II fractures occur at the base of the odontoid, between the level of the transverse ligament and the body of the axis. They are the commonest type and are considered unstable. Type III fractures extend into the vertebral body and are relatively stable unless significantly displaced.

What are the chances of dying from breaking your neck?

Half (50.2%) of the patients were admitted and treated at a designated trauma center. Mortality rate during the initial hospitalization was 9.87% and 30-day mortality was 14.4%. Long-term mortality was 28.29% at 1 year, and 50.32% for the entire 15-year study period.

How are bone fragments removed from the back of the neck?

Complicated injuries are occasionally treated with incisions in both the front and the back of the neck. If there are bone fragments pressing against the spinal cord, the surgeon may remove them entirely. This is called surgical decompression. Successful repair of the broken parts of the bone can lead to excellent recoveries.

Where is the incision for a neck fracture made?

If you need surgery, an incision is usually made in the back of the neck. A surgeon will fuse the broken bone together using small rods and screws. Sometimes the incision is made in the front of the neck. Complicated injuries are occasionally treated with incisions in both the front and the back of the neck.

Can a C2 vertebrae be fused in the back of the neck?

In some cases, the C2 and C3 vertebrae are fused together. In one study, fusion surgery done through the back of the neck proved to be 100 percent successful within six months.

What kind of X-ray do you need for neck fracture?

A special type of X-ray, called a computed tomography (CT) scan, can take a series of cross-section images of the neck. These highly detailed images may be necessary to see bone damage that isn’t revealed in a standard X-ray.