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How long does it take for carpal tunnel surgery incision to heal?

How long does it take for carpal tunnel surgery incision to heal?

The recovery from carpal tunnel surgery takes time – anywhere from several weeks to several months. If the nerve has been compressed for a long period of time, recovery may take even longer. Recovery involves splinting your wrist and getting physical therapy to strengthen and heal the wrist and hand.

How do you treat the incision after carpal tunnel surgery?

Wound Care

  1. Keep your incision dry, but it is okay to take a shower and wash your hands.
  2. Keep the surgical wound covered with a band aid or bandage for the first week.
  3. Elevate your hand above your heart when up.
  4. Report redness, swelling or drainage to our office at 804-320-1339.

How do you clean carpal tunnel incisions?

Soap and water are an excellent skin cleanser, and it is OK to get everything wet in a shower with running water. Avoid immersing your wound under water until the sutures are removed. Please do not use salves like Neosporin™ or Bacitracin™ for the wound.

How long should you have swelling after carpal tunnel surgery?

Expect to have pain, swelling, and stiffness after the operation. Your doctor will let you know what medicines might help. You may have some soreness for anywhere from a few weeks to a few months after surgery. Your bandage will stay on for 1-2 weeks.

How long does it take for carpal tunnel surgery to work?

Carpal tunnel release surgery is a low-risk procedure with high success in quickly relieving nighttime and neurological symptoms. Numbness, coordination, and strength in the hand gradually improves over several weeks and months and may improve up to or beyond a year from the surgery. See Treatment Options for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

What are the milestones for carpal tunnel surgery?

Recovery Milestones for Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery Driving, self-care activities, typing, and light lifting and gripping are permitted around this time. A splint may be used occasionally during this time to take pressure off the wrist and alleviate pain.

How to take care of your hand after carpal tunnel surgery?

Take precautions to avoid bumping or banging your hand into things. Even while you hand is in bandages, a light bang can easily rip your stitches open. Then you have to go back to the doctor and start the aftercare clock from the beginning. Also, be sure to elevate your hand as often as you can.

What kind of surgery is needed for carpal tunnel syndrome?

To treat carpal tunnel syndrome you will have a hand operation called carpal tunnel release surgery. There are two basic types of this surgery, so ask your surgeon which you will have (see photos below). Open carpal tunnel release surgery requires a longer incision on your palm. It also causes more trauma, more pain, and longer recovery time.

How big is the incision for a carpal tunnel release?

In an open release surgery, the surgeon cuts about a 2-inch incision on the wrist. Then he or she uses common surgical instruments to cut the carpal ligament and enlarge the carpal tunnel. In an endoscopic carpal tunnel release, the doctor makes 2, half-inch incisions. One is on the wrist, and one is on the palm.

How to recover from carpal tunnel release surgery?

Recovering from Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery Recovery Milestones for Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery Driving, self-care activities, typing, and light lifting and gripping are permitted around this time. A splint may be used occasionally during this time to take pressure off the wrist and alleviate pain.

Recovery Milestones for Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery Driving, self-care activities, typing, and light lifting and gripping are permitted around this time. A splint may be used occasionally during this time to take pressure off the wrist and alleviate pain.

To treat carpal tunnel syndrome you will have a hand operation called carpal tunnel release surgery. There are two basic types of this surgery, so ask your surgeon which you will have (see photos below). Open carpal tunnel release surgery requires a longer incision on your palm. It also causes more trauma, more pain, and longer recovery time.