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How often is hemochromatosis misdiagnosed?

How often is hemochromatosis misdiagnosed?

Of the 173 patients with nonhereditary hemochromatosis genotypes, 53% were misdiagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis and 38% underwent phlebotomy. In two thirds of these cases, the misdiagnosis was made by a nonspecialist.

Is it difficult to diagnose hereditary hemochromatosis?

Hereditary hemochromatosis can be difficult to diagnose. Early symptoms such as stiff joints and fatigue may be due to conditions other than hemochromatosis.

What is the treatment for hereditary hemochromatosis disease?

Treatment includes regularly removing blood from your body. Because much of the body’s iron is contained in red blood cells, this treatment lowers iron levels. Some people with hereditary hemochromatosis never have symptoms.

When does iron accumulation in hereditary hemochromatosis occur?

Iron accumulation in classic hereditary hemochromatosis occurs slowly over many years. Eventually, iron accumulation causes tissue damage and impaired functioning of affected organs. In many affected individuals, symptoms may not become apparent until some point between 40-60 years of age. Onset is usually earlier for men compared to women.

When do symptoms of hemochromatosis start in men?

This is because iron buildup occurs slowly throughout a person’s life. Symptoms usually begin in men in their late 30’s to 50’s. In women, symptoms usually start 10 to 15 years after menopause, when they no longer lose iron with menstruation.

Hereditary hemochromatosis can be difficult to diagnose. Early symptoms such as stiff joints and fatigue may be due to conditions other than hemochromatosis.

Treatment includes regularly removing blood from your body. Because much of the body’s iron is contained in red blood cells, this treatment lowers iron levels. Some people with hereditary hemochromatosis never have symptoms.

Iron accumulation in classic hereditary hemochromatosis occurs slowly over many years. Eventually, iron accumulation causes tissue damage and impaired functioning of affected organs. In many affected individuals, symptoms may not become apparent until some point between 40-60 years of age. Onset is usually earlier for men compared to women.

This is because iron buildup occurs slowly throughout a person’s life. Symptoms usually begin in men in their late 30’s to 50’s. In women, symptoms usually start 10 to 15 years after menopause, when they no longer lose iron with menstruation.