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Is atypical small acinar proliferation cancer?

Is atypical small acinar proliferation cancer?

Overview. Atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) that is suspicious for malignancy is not a specific pathologic entity; instead, it is a diagnosis that incorporates a continuum ranging from benign, histologically atypical mimics of cancer to marginally sampled cancer.

What does ASAP mean on prostate biopsy?

ASAP stands for atypical small acinar proliferation. It means there are unusual cells in your prostate but it’s not clear what they are or if they are cancerous. ASAP can be a group of cells that could be cancer cells but that are still too small to see clearly under the microscope.

What is ASAP in urology?

Abstract. Background: Atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) occurs in approximately 5% of prostate biopsies. Approximately 30-40% of patients with ASAP may develop prostate cancer (PCa) within a 5-year period. Current guidelines recommend a repeat biopsy within 3-6 months after the initial diagnosis.

What is acinar adenocarcinoma?

Acinar adenocarcinoma Adenocarcinomas are cancers that develop in the gland cells that line the prostate gland. They are the most common type of prostate cancer. Nearly everyone with prostate cancer has this type.

What does atypical small acinar proliferation mean?

This is referred to as atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). ASAP, which is defined as a “focus of small acinar structures formed by atypical epithelial cells,” is a condition in which the pathologist has insufficient data to make a diagnosis and thus raises the suspicion of cancer.

What is atypical small acinar proliferation ASAP?

Atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) is a diagnosis that occurs in about 1-2% of prostate biopsies [3]. The term ASAP, first defined by Bostwick, represents suspicious glands without adequate histologic atypia for a definitive diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma [4].

What is atypical proliferation?

When does atypical small acinar proliferation ( ASAP ) represent undersampled cancer?

When an atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) diagnosis represents undersampled cancer, the cancer is clinicopathologically similar to cancer diagnosed on first biopsy.

Which is biopsy shows focus of small acinar proliferation?

A prostatic core biopsy showing a focus of atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) suspicious for, but not diagnostic of, cancer (arrow, A).

When to use the term small acinar proliferation?

Term should be restricted to lesions that are probably carcinoma but either lack definitive diagnostic features or are too small to be certain that they do not represent the edge of a benign lesion It should not be used if the lesion is benign but just unusual looking

How many patients with ASAP have adenocarcinoma?

The term ASAP, first defined by Bostwick, represents suspicious glands without adequate histologic atypia for a definitive diagnosis of prostate adenocarcinoma [4]. Previous studies have suggested that 17–70% of patients with ASAP have adenocarcinoma present on subsequent prostate biopsies [5, 6].

What does atypical small acinar proliferation stand for?

Atypical small acinar proliferation, abbreviated ASAP, is a small number of prostate glands that are abnormal and suspicious for carcinoma . It is also known as suspicious for carcinoma.

When to do a prostate biopsy for atypical small acinar proliferation?

Purpose: Guidelines for atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) diagnosed on prostate biopsy recommend repeat biopsy within 3-6 months after diagnosis. We sought to discern the rate of detecting clinically significant prostate cancer on repeat biopsy and predictors associated with progression.

Can a patient be diagnosed with ASAP managed prostate cancer?

Conclusions: Patients diagnosed with ASAP managed according to guideline recommendations are more likely diagnosed with benign pathology and indolent prostate cancer on repeat biopsy.

How are patients diagnosed with ASAP managed according to guideline recommendations?

Patients diagnosed with ASAP managed according to guideline recommendations are more likely diagnosed with benign pathology and indolent prostate cancer on repeat biopsy. These findings support prior studies suggesting refinement of guidelines in regard to the appropriateness and timeliness of repea …