Popular guidelines

Is there a disorder for violent thoughts?

Is there a disorder for violent thoughts?

Harm OCD is a subset of classic obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The condition is characterized by having aggressive, intrusive thoughts of doing violence to someone, as well as the responses the person uses to cope with these thoughts. OCD makes the individual feel that they can’t trust their own mind.

Can you be traumatized by intrusive thoughts?

PTSD intrusive thoughts can trigger other PTSD symptoms, such as intense arousal, that may make the situation even worse.

Are there any myths about unwanted intrusive thoughts?

Unwanted Intrusive thoughts can be very explicit, and many people are ashamed and worried about them, and therefore keep them secret. There are many myths about unwanted intrusive thoughts. One of the most distressing is that having such thoughts mean that you unconsciously want to do the things that come into your mind.

Why do I have so many stuck thoughts?

More than any other symptom of my depression — more so even than unrestrained tears and bawling my eyes out in public — the stuck thoughts make me feel truly insane, scared to be living inside my body and mind. In my post 9 Ways to Let Go of Stuck Thoughts, I offer some tools to deal with obsessions.

What causes unwanted thoughts to come into your head?

Anxiety is the type of mental health disorder that specifically causes negative thinking, and the inability to control the thoughts that come into your head. For some people, anxiety itself can be caused by these thoughts. Unwanted thoughts are especially common with obsessive compulsive disorder,…

Do you have unwanted intrusive thoughts about suicide?

People who have unwanted intrusive thoughts about suicide love life. And those who have thoughts of yelling blasphemies in church value their religious life. A second myth is that every thought we have is worth examining. In truth, these thoughts are not messages, red flags, signals or warnings–despite how they feel.

Unwanted Intrusive thoughts can be very explicit, and many people are ashamed and worried about them, and therefore keep them secret. There are many myths about unwanted intrusive thoughts. One of the most distressing is that having such thoughts mean that you unconsciously want to do the things that come into your mind.

People who have unwanted intrusive thoughts about suicide love life. And those who have thoughts of yelling blasphemies in church value their religious life. A second myth is that every thought we have is worth examining. In truth, these thoughts are not messages, red flags, signals or warnings–despite how they feel.

What happens when you have an explosive outburst?

The explosive verbal and behavioral outbursts are out of proportion to the situation, with no thought to consequences, and can include: You may feel a sense of relief and tiredness after the episode. Later, you may feel remorse, regret or embarrassment.

Are there any red flags for unwanted intrusive thoughts?

In truth, these thoughts are not messages, red flags, signals or warnings–despite how they feel. The problem for people who have these thoughts–and one estimate is that more than 6 million people in the United States are troubled by them– is that unwanted intrusive thoughts feel so threatening.