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What does a monoclonal spike mean?

What does a monoclonal spike mean?

A monoclonal spike (M spike or paraprotein) on serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) is a frequent finding in the general population and typically is pathognomonic of an asymptomatic, premalignant condition called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

What causes monoclonal spike?

Many conditions can cause a monoclonal gammopathy, a spike in one protein product; and, not all of these conditions are cancerous. You can have M protein with certain connective tissue disorders, like systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis.

Is there a small monoclonal spike in Gamma?

Small monoclonal spike in the gamma region (0.63 g/dL) is identified by immunofixation as monoclonal IgG lambda. SPEP Small monoclonal spike in the gamma region (0.63 g/dL) is…

Can a monoclonal protein be measured on a SPEP test?

A caveat with SPEP: Immunoglobulin A-type (IgA) myeloma monoclonal protein does not separate out in the gamma region of the graph. It can get “stuck” with the beta or even alpha proteins. Patients with IgA myeloma should discuss the best way to measure their monoclonal protein with their doctors.

What does it mean when you have a small M spike?

Many people develop something called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) which is a benign condition in which you have a small M spike. This occurs with greater frequency in older patients. Sometimes MGUS develops into myeloma (or another malignant disease) but most of the time it does not.

How is the level of monoclonal protein measured?

In addition to the spike for albumin, there is another tall spike. The red arrow in the gamma region of the graph indicates this spike. A pathologist measures the area under the spike, or curve, and subtracts the normal level of gamma globulins from the total. The result is your level of monoclonal protein (M-protein).

Small monoclonal spike in the gamma region (0.63 g/dL) is identified by immunofixation as monoclonal IgG lambda. SPEP Small monoclonal spike in the gamma region (0.63 g/dL) is…

A caveat with SPEP: Immunoglobulin A-type (IgA) myeloma monoclonal protein does not separate out in the gamma region of the graph. It can get “stuck” with the beta or even alpha proteins. Patients with IgA myeloma should discuss the best way to measure their monoclonal protein with their doctors.

Many people develop something called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) which is a benign condition in which you have a small M spike. This occurs with greater frequency in older patients. Sometimes MGUS develops into myeloma (or another malignant disease) but most of the time it does not.

In addition to the spike for albumin, there is another tall spike. The red arrow in the gamma region of the graph indicates this spike. A pathologist measures the area under the spike, or curve, and subtracts the normal level of gamma globulins from the total. The result is your level of monoclonal protein (M-protein).