Users' questions

What does an amputation stump feel like?

What does an amputation stump feel like?

The pain is often described as aching, throbbing, shooting, cramping, or burning. Non-painful sensations may include feelings of numbness, itching, paresthesias, twisting, pressure or even the perception of involuntary muscle movements in the residual limb at the amputation site.

What are the indication of amputation?

Indications for amputation vary between and within countries. In the Western world, peripheral vascular disease is the commonest indication for amputation. In Nigeria, however, trauma and traditional bone setter (TBS) gangrene are the leading indications. Temporal change in indications also occurs.

What happens to a stump after an amputation?

These amputations can be complicated by stump wound infections, leading to morbidity, bad quality of life, and additional health care costs [2], [3]. Wound infections (13 to 40%) have been observed following major lower-limb amputation [4].

How can you tell if you have a stump infection?

The presence of a sinus tract was the most significant sign of stump infection; this was the case for 47 patients (65%) at the initial evaluation. Localized inflammation was observed in 14 cases (19%), ulceration in 13 cases (18%), abscess in 6 cases (8%), and pain during the fitting of the prosthesis in 5 cases (7%).

Are there any complications with a Syme amputation?

Potential complications. This is normal and not painful. However, some patients may develop nerve pain where major nerves were cut (phantom limb pain). Because of potential complications of Syme amputations discussed earlier, sometimes a Syme amputation has to be revised to a below the knee amputation (BKA).

Is it possible to have phantom limb pain after an amputation?

As with all amputations, there is also a possibility of experiencing either ‘stump pain’ or ‘phantom limb pain’. This is a severe pain in the remaining tissue, which can be managed with painkillers. It generally resolves with time. This refers to the phenomenon of feeling pain or sensations in the amputated toe, as if it is still there.

These amputations can be complicated by stump wound infections, leading to morbidity, bad quality of life, and additional health care costs [2], [3]. Wound infections (13 to 40%) have been observed following major lower-limb amputation [4].

The presence of a sinus tract was the most significant sign of stump infection; this was the case for 47 patients (65%) at the initial evaluation. Localized inflammation was observed in 14 cases (19%), ulceration in 13 cases (18%), abscess in 6 cases (8%), and pain during the fitting of the prosthesis in 5 cases (7%).

What kind of pain can you feel after an amputation?

Commonly used descriptors include sharp, cramping, burning, electric, jumping, crushing and cramping. In addition to these 4 pain types that can be experienced following amputation, clinicians should also be aware of the pain that may be caused by co-existing pathology:

Are there any complications associated with lower limb amputation?

Potential wound-healing complications associated with lower limb amputation stumps include infection, tissue necrosis, pain, problems associated with the surrounding skin, bone erosion, haematoma, stump oedema and dehiscence. The highest rate of surgical site infection is associated with lower limb amputations.