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What is Salter II fracture?

What is Salter II fracture?

Salter-Harris type II fractures are the most common type of physeal fractures that occur in children. There is a fracture that extends through the physis and into a portion of the metaphysis. A triangular metaphyseal fragment, otherwise known as the Thurston Holland fragment, will be left intact.

How do you treat a Salter-Harris Type 2 fracture?

Salter-Harris fractures are usually caused by traumatic injuries and result in symptoms of pain and swelling near the end of a long bone. Diagnosis is often made through a clinical examination and X-ray. Treatment for all types of these fractures typically involves rest, application of ice, and elevation of the limb.

What is a Type III fracture?

A type III fracture (see the images below) is a fracture through the physis and epiphysis. This fracture passes through the hypertrophic layer of the physis and extends to split the epiphysis, inevitably damaging the reproductive layer of the physis.

What is open fracture type I or II?

They categorized open injuries into the familiar three categories, based on wound size, level of contamination, and osseous injury, as follows: Type I = an open fracture with a wound less than 1 cm long and clean; Type II = an open fracture with a laceration greater than 1 cm long without extensive soft tissue damage.

Do you cast a Salter-Harris fracture?

Your child’s injury may need to be put in a cast or splint if a Salter-Harris fracture is known or suspected. This will help prevent more injury to the growth plate and surrounding bone. If the bone is not displaced (moved out of place), your child may get a cast to secure the bone as it heals.

What is the most common Salter-Harris fracture?

In general, upper extremity injuries are more common than lower-extremity injuries. Of the five most common Salter-Harris fracture types, type II is the most common (75%) followed by types III (10%), IV (10%), type I (5%), and lastly, type V which is very rare.

How do you treat a Salter-Harris fracture?

How is a Salter-Harris fracture treated?

  1. Prescription pain medicine may be given.
  2. A cast or splint may be used to help prevent movement in the injured area until more treatment is done.
  3. Surgery may be needed to repair certain types of Salter-Harris fractures.

What is a Type 2 open fracture?

What is a grade 2 open fracture?

II. Open fracture, wound > 1 cm but < 10 cm in length without extensive soft-tissue damage, flaps, avulsions. IIIA. Open fracture with adequate soft tissue coverage of a fractured bone despite extensive soft tissue laceration or flaps, or high-energy trauma (gunshot and farm injuries) regardless of the size of the …

When do you need a cast for a broken foot?

If your broken bone is displaced and requires surgery or pins to help stabilize it, the healing time will be longer than a bone that is not displaced and requires no surgery. If you drop something on your big toe or stub it on the sofa and break it, you may be surprised to find that you will need a cast or walking boot.

When do you need a second wrist cast?

You may need a second cast if you have a complex break. For the first few days following a break, elevate your wrist above your heart to ease pain and swelling. Icing may also be recommended. We usually advise sessions of 15-30 minutes every two to three hours for the first two to three days.

When to apply plaster cast for distal radial physeal fracture?

Treatment can be determined according to the Salter-Harris classification (Table 2). Table 2: ED management of distal radial physeal fractures. Below-elbow plaster cast for 6 weeks. For young children, above-elbow casts may be applied

What causes a distal radial physeal fracture in a child?

Distal radial physeal fractures are uncommon in children younger than five years. The most common mechanism of injury is a fall on an outstretched hand (Figure 1). Extension of the wrist at the time of injury causes the distal fragment to be displaced dorsally (posteriorly).

How long do you have to wear a cast for a fracture?

The length of time the cast is worn will vary depending on the severity of the fracture. A stable fracture, such as a buckle fracture, may require 3 to 4 weeks in a cast. A more serious injury, such as a Monteggia fracture, may need to be immobilized for 6 to 10 weeks.

Treatment can be determined according to the Salter-Harris classification (Table 2). Table 2: ED management of distal radial physeal fractures. Below-elbow plaster cast for 6 weeks. For young children, above-elbow casts may be applied

How does a Smith Fracture of the distal radius shear?

A Smith fracture of the distal radius Shear: This refers to the action of the bone and its movement as the result of the fracture. As the fracture occurs, the bone shears – one end of the bone moves in one direction while the other moves in the opposite direction, similar to a highway being sheared by an earthquake.

Distal radial physeal fractures are uncommon in children younger than five years. The most common mechanism of injury is a fall on an outstretched hand (Figure 1). Extension of the wrist at the time of injury causes the distal fragment to be displaced dorsally (posteriorly).