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What should I know about taking a headache history?

What should I know about taking a headache history?

This guide provides a structured approach to taking a headache history in an OSCE setting. The vast majority of headaches are not life-threatening, with tension headache and migraine being the most common diagnoses.

When to see a doctor for headaches and migraines?

While your doctor may be able to determine the cause of your headaches, a neurologist has the tools and tests available to diagnose and treat whatever the root cause is. If you are suffering from frequent or extreme headaches or your headaches are accompanied by other symptoms, doctors at Beaumont can help.

How often do people go to neurology for headaches?

One in 30 people have headache more often than not, for 6 months or more. At least 90% of patients seen in a neurology outpatient clinic with headache will have migraine, tension type headache, or a chronic daily headache syndrome. Sinister causes of headache are rare, perhaps 0.1% of all headaches in primary care.

What are the results of a neurologic exam for migraine?

Although a thorough screening neurologic examination is essential, the results will be normal in most patients with headache. Evidence of autonomic nervous system involvement can be helpful, although most patients with migraine exhibit few or no findings.

How can seeing a neurologist for migraine can help?

Neurologists specialize in disorders of the nervous system, including the brain. Migraine is a neurological disorder. A neurologist can help make an accurate diagnosis of migraine, as well as rule out any other potential neurological condition that may cause similar symptoms.

This guide provides a structured approach to taking a headache history in an OSCE setting. The vast majority of headaches are not life-threatening, with tension headache and migraine being the most common diagnoses.

How are migraines a neurological or vascular disorder?

It has long been established that migraines are neurological in nature. Researchers have identified possible causes of migraines, and one of the contributors is a problem in the brainstem. Together with the trigeminal nerve, the brainstem is the body’s main road for sensing pain.

What kind of Doctor do you see for headaches?

As a general rule, for non-severe headaches, your family doctor is a great place to start. However, if the recommended treatments are not working well or you have unusual symptoms, you may need a neurologist, who specializes in disorders of the nervous system.

Is it possible to get a migraine from a headache?

Headache is a common presenting complaint and certainly something you’ll encounter many times over your career. The vast majority of headaches are not life-threatening, with tension headache and migraine being the most common diagnoses.

What’s the difference between a migraine and a tension headache?

Migraines typically present as a unilateral headache whereas bilateral headache is most commonly associated with a tension headache. Clarify how and when the headache developed: “Did the headache come on suddenly or gradually?” “When did the headache first start?” “How long have you been experiencing the headache?”

What kind of headaches are not life threatening?

The vast majority of headaches are not life-threatening, with tension headache and migraine being the most common diagnoses.

What is the best medicine for migraine?

Ibuprofen is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and is another best medicine for migraine headaches and sinus headaches. It treats pain and reduces inflammation. The pain can be of a head, tooth, menstrual cramp and bones.

How long will my migraine last?

A migraine can last anywhere from 4 to 72 hours. It can be difficult to predict how long an individual migraine will last, but charting its progress may help.

What is the etymology of migraine?

The word migraine was derived from the Latin word “hemicrania” meaning “half” (hemi) “skull” ( crania ).

Where is the migraine located?

Migraine pain can be located anywhere in the head — not just in the typical places you think of a headache, but inside or behind the eye, or in the face, teeth, roof of the mouth or ears.