Popular guidelines

What should you do if you get a needle stick injury?

What should you do if you get a needle stick injury?

Wash needlesticks and cuts with soap and water. Flush splashes to the nose, mouth, or skin with water. Irrigate eyes with clean water, saline, or sterile irrigants. Report the incident to your supervisor.

What should you do if you get a needlestick injury?

If a person sustains a needlestick injury: Administer appropriate first aid for any bleeding or embedded object. Gain assistance from a first aid attendant as required. Wash the wound or skin sites thoroughly with soap and water or use a waterless cleanser or antiseptic if water is unavailable.

Can you get HIV from a needlestick injury?

Contracting HIV after needlestick injury is rare. From 1981 to 2006, the CDC documented only 57 cases of HIV/AIDS in healthcare workers following occupational exposure and identified an additional “possible” 140 cases post-exposure.5,6 Of the 57 documented cases, 48 sustained a percutaneous injury.

What are the hazards of needlestick and sharps injuries?

Essentially, any object that is able to cut the skin can be considered a “sharp”. What are the hazards of needlestick and sharps injuries? These injuries transmit infectious diseases, especially blood-borne viruses.

When to test for hepatitis C from a needle stick?

Testing should be repeated at 3 and 6 months. If the source of the exposure is positive for Hepatitis C nucleic acid ( HCV should be considered. antibody status immediately. Negative results do not exclude the possibility of infectivity. Counselling and consent required.

Can a needle stick injury cause hepatitis C?

[Transmission of hepatitis C by accidental needlestick injuries. Evaluation of the risk] The risk of transmitting contagious diseases by accidental needle-stick injury has raised a considerable amount of concern among hospital staff. Before generalized vaccination in the early 80s, there was a high risk of hepatitis B transmission.

Who is at risk for a needle stick injury?

Health workers have a great risk of having a needle stick injury and Management of Needlestick Injuries in the Health Care Setting is a challenge. Needlestick injuries are a major cause of transmission of pathogens from patient to health care professional.

Contracting HIV after needlestick injury is rare. From 1981 to 2006, the CDC documented only 57 cases of HIV/AIDS in healthcare workers following occupational exposure and identified an additional “possible” 140 cases post-exposure.5,6 Of the 57 documented cases, 48 sustained a percutaneous injury.

What should you do if you get a needlestick cut?

If you experienced a needlestick injury or were exposed to the blood or other body fluid of a patient during the course of your work, immediately follow these steps: Wash needlesticks and cuts with soap and water Flush splashes to the nose, mouth, or skin with water Irrigate eyes with clean water, saline, or sterile irrigants