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What was the swine flu like in 1976?

What was the swine flu like in 1976?

In 1976, the risk from flu was theoretical, too. Despite a scary and fatal outbreak of an H1N1 swine flu at a military base, the virus never spread. The 1976 H1N1 swine flu was a very different virus from the 2009 H1N1 swine flu, which combines elements from flu viruses that evolved in birds, humans, and pigs.

What are the side effects of the swine flu shot?

About one in three people get a sore arm from the shot, some with a little redness or even swelling. Some 10% to 15% of people feel tired or get a headache; some may even run a low fever.

How did the swine flu spread in the US?

Swine Flu at Fort Dix. In 1974 and 1975, 2 instances of humans infected with swine influenza viruses had been documented in the United States. Both persons involved had close contact with pigs, and no evidence for spread of the virus beyond family members with pig contact could be found ( 5 ).

Who was president at the time of the swine flu?

President Gerald Ford’s staff recommended that the president convene a large group of well-known and respected scientists (Albert Sabin and Jonas Salk had to be included) and public representatives to hear the government’s proposal and make recommendations to the president about it.

How many soldiers were infected with swine flu in 1976?

Isolates of virus taken from them included A/New Jersey/76 (Hsw1n1), a strain similar to the virus believed at the time to be the cause of the 1918 pandemic, commonly known as swine flu. Serologic studies at Fort Dix suggested that >200 soldiers had been infected and that person-to-person transmission had occurred.

About one in three people get a sore arm from the shot, some with a little redness or even swelling. Some 10% to 15% of people feel tired or get a headache; some may even run a low fever.

Is the swine flu virus growing fast in laboratories?

The swine flu virus is not growing very fast in laboratories, making it difficult for scientists to get the key ingredient they need for a vaccine, the ‘seed stock’ from the virus […]

Swine Flu at Fort Dix. In 1974 and 1975, 2 instances of humans infected with swine influenza viruses had been documented in the United States. Both persons involved had close contact with pigs, and no evidence for spread of the virus beyond family members with pig contact could be found ( 5 ).