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When to treat acute and chronic urinary retention?

When to treat acute and chronic urinary retention?

It may strike suddenly and intensely (acute), as the result of a blockage, or it may be chronic and ongoing as a result of an enlarged prostate. Acute retention must be treated immediately to relieve symptoms and avoid organ damage. Chronic retention is generally treated over a longer period of time to either remedy or manage the condition.

When to see an urologist for urinary retention?

When urinary retention occurs, it’s important to be examined by a qualified healthcare professional as soon as possible. Urologists regularly treat patients with retention, and rely on several evaluation tools to assist in their diagnosis.

What happens to your bladder when you have urinary retention?

Your bladder is like a storage tank for the waste product urine. When the bladder is full, you urinate and the waste leaves your body. However, if you have urinary retention, your bladder doesn’t completely empty when you urinate.

When do you need a catheter for urinary retention?

However, your health care professional may need to use a catheter to drain the urine from your bladder if the retention continues or becomes severe. In some cases, people with urinary retention need to continue using a catheter to drain urine from the bladder until their urinary retention can be fixed.

What to do if you have acute urinary retention?

Draining the bladder With acute urinary retention, a health care professional will immediately drain the urine from your bladder using a catheter. Removing the urine from the bladder eases your pain and helps prevent your bladder and kidneys from being damaged.

Your bladder is like a storage tank for the waste product urine. When the bladder is full, you urinate and the waste leaves your body. However, if you have urinary retention, your bladder doesn’t completely empty when you urinate.

What does chronic urinary retention ( Cur ) mean?

In research settings, chronic urinary retention (CUR) typically describes a persistent inability to completely empty the bladder despite maintaining an ability to urinate, which results in elevated postvoid residual (PVR) urine volumes.

Can a person with chronic urinary retention go to the toilet?

With chronic urinary retention, you may be able to urinate, but you have trouble starting a stream or emptying your bladder completely. You may urinate frequently; you may feel an urgent need to urinate but have little success when you get to the toilet; or you may feel you still have to go after you’ve finished urinating.