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Where is the latissimus dorsi tendon?

Where is the latissimus dorsi tendon?

The insertion of the latissimus dorsi tendon (LDT) is located at the crest of the lesser tuberosity of the proximal humerus posterior to the pectoralis major tendon and anterior to the teres major tendon. The most important functions are adduction, extension, and internal rotation of the shoulder.

How do you treat a pulled latissimus dorsi?

How is this pain treated?

  1. R: resting your back and shoulders from, and cutting back on, physical activities.
  2. I: icing the painful area with an ice pack or cold compress.
  3. C: using compression by applying an elastic bandage.
  4. E: elevating the area by sitting upright or placing pillows behind your upper back or shoulder.

How to tell if you have a latissimus dorsi tear?

Another patient presented with a classic history of acute trauma while water-skiing, with a ripping sensation and axillary pain. The referring physician suspected a latissimus dorsi tear, and ordered an MR of the proximal humerus. A shoulder MR was also ordered, to evaluate more proximal pain.

What causes muscle edema in the latissimus dorsi?

Latissimus dorsi tears can present with pain following recent trauma, or as a chronic injury in the form of a pseudomass. Another cause of muscle edema within the latissimus dorsi is an acute denervation injury. The following case is of a patient who presented with shoulder pain, but no known injury (Figures 11 and 12).

Is the latissimus dorsi and teres major tendon discrete?

Often the teres major tendon and latissimus dorsi tendon become confluent proximal to their insertion, so the teres major tendon is not identifiable as a discrete linear structure like the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major (Figure 8).

How are the muscles of the latissimus torn?

(1a) Oblique coronal fat suppressed T2-weighted and (1b) sagittal T2-weighted and (1c) axial fat suppressed proton density-weighted images. On the coronal fat suppressed T2-weighted image, the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles are edematous, torn, and retracted medially (arrows).

Another patient presented with a classic history of acute trauma while water-skiing, with a ripping sensation and axillary pain. The referring physician suspected a latissimus dorsi tear, and ordered an MR of the proximal humerus. A shoulder MR was also ordered, to evaluate more proximal pain.

(1a) Oblique coronal fat suppressed T2-weighted and (1b) sagittal T2-weighted and (1c) axial fat suppressed proton density-weighted images. On the coronal fat suppressed T2-weighted image, the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles are edematous, torn, and retracted medially (arrows).

Often the teres major tendon and latissimus dorsi tendon become confluent proximal to their insertion, so the teres major tendon is not identifiable as a discrete linear structure like the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major (Figure 8).

What kind of flexion does the LAT test show?

The Lat Test evaluates shoulder flexion which includes the flexibility of the latissimus dorsi muscle group, shoulder joint restrictions and scapular motion limitations. The lat muscle spans the entire back and inserts onto the arm.