Users' questions

Which is correct I kept waiting for an hour Last Night?

Which is correct I kept waiting for an hour Last Night?

I kept waiting for an hour last night. I was kept waiting for an hour last night. Both the sentences are grammatically correct, with a difference in meaning. The first sentence indicates that you continued waiting of your own free will for an hour last night.

What does wait mean in English grammar today?

from English Grammar Today. Wait means ‘stay in the same place or not do something until something else happens’. We can use it with or without for: Put a tea bag into the cup, then add water and wait (for) a minute or two before taking it out. I phoned the head office but I had to wait (for) five minutes before I spoke to anyone.

What does it mean to be kept waiting by someone?

If you are kept waiting by someone then that means you did keep waiting while the other person didn’t show up. (This seems like a very poor question, though; I would never make such a distinction unless it was demanded of me.)

When do you use the phrase’can’t wait’?

Can’t wait. When we are very excited about something that is going to happen, we use the phrase can’t wait for + noun phrase or can’t wait + to -infinitive: I can’t wait for tonight. I’m having a party! (I’m really looking forward to tonight.)

Which is better I have been waiting or I have waited?

How Long ” or the “Duration” of the time, or how long you have waited. It is better to use Present Perfect Progressive (with ING in the end). So I would say “. I have been waiting here for hours” is better than “I have waited here for hours”.

I kept waiting for an hour last night. I was kept waiting for an hour last night. Both the sentences are grammatically correct, with a difference in meaning. The first sentence indicates that you continued waiting of your own free will for an hour last night.

Who are the panelists on Wait Wait?

On November 16, 2011, BBC America announced that the show would make its television debut with a “2011 Year in Review” special airing on December 23, to be retransmitted by NPR stations on the 24th and 25th. The taping included two American panelists— Wait Wait regulars Paula Poundstone and Alonzo Bodden —and British newcomer Nick Hancock.

Where does Wait Wait Don’t Tell me take place?

Don’t Tell Me! episodes Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! is usually recorded in front of a live audience in Chicago at the Chase Auditorium beneath the Chase Tower on Thursday nights. Until May 2005, the show was recorded in one of Chicago Public Radio’s studios, with no audience and often with one or more panelists calling in from other locations.