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Why do moles run in my family?

Why do moles run in my family?

Heredity contributes to the development of dysplastic nevi and to having a higher-than-average number of benign moles. Spending a lot of time in the sun can also increase the number of moles a person has.

Are skin moles hereditary?

Most moles are inherited. People brought up in sunny places tend to have more moles than others with the same type of skin who were raised in areas with comparatively little sun exposure.

How big are moles and what do they look like?

Color and texture. Moles can be brown, tan, black, red, blue or pink. They can be smooth, wrinkled, flat or raised. They may have hair growing from them. Shape. Most moles are oval or round. Size. Moles are usually less than 1/4 inch (about 6 millimeters) in diameter — the size of a pencil eraser.

Is it normal to have 40 moles on your face?

Most people have 10 to 40 moles, some of which may change in appearance or fade away over time. Most moles are harmless. Rarely, they become cancerous. Monitoring moles and other pigmented patches is an important step in detecting skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma.

How are moles distributed in the human body?

Melanocytes are distributed throughout your skin and produce melanin, the natural pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma is the main complication of moles. Some people have a higher than average risk of their moles becoming cancerous and developing into melanoma. Factors that increase your risk of melanoma include:

Why do some people get more moles than others?

Take measures to protect your skin from ultraviolet (UV) radiation, such as from the sun or tanning beds. UV radiation has been linked to increased melanoma risk. And children who haven’t been protected from sun exposure tend to develop more moles.

What are the different types of moles on the skin?

Moles are growths on the skin that are usually brown or black. Moles can appear anywhere on the skin, alone or in groups. Moles occur when cells in the skin grow in a cluster instead of being spread throughout the skin.

How are atypical moles related to skin cancer?

How They Affect You. Atypical moles, also known as dysplastic nevi, are unusual-looking moles that have irregular features under the microscope. Though benign, they are worth more of your attention because individuals with atypical moles are at increased risk for melanoma, a dangerous skin cancer. An atypical mole can occur anywhere on the body.

Most people have 10 to 40 moles, some of which may change in appearance or fade away over time. Most moles are harmless. Rarely, they become cancerous. Monitoring moles and other pigmented patches is an important step in detecting skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma.

Melanocytes are distributed throughout your skin and produce melanin, the natural pigment that gives your skin its color. Melanoma is the main complication of moles. Some people have a higher than average risk of their moles becoming cancerous and developing into melanoma. Factors that increase your risk of melanoma include: