Users' questions

Why do some mothers suffer from postpartum depression?

Why do some mothers suffer from postpartum depression?

The reality is, many mothers struggle with a degree of post-pregnancy blues, and one in five women experiences depression at some point in her life. Some mothers suffer from more severe, longer lasting symptoms of postpartum depression. This can result from hormonal changes or even traumatic birth experiences.

Is it common for new moms to have depression?

Depression is common among mothers, and many new moms suffer from depression. A 2003 University of Michigan study revealed that one in five women may face depression during pregnancy.

How does one mother manage her ongoing struggle with depression?

As a 35-year-old mom, I felt like I couldn’t pause my life while my depression played out. I started seeing a therapist bimonthly and met for four months. She suggested I pay more money to be tested for attention deficit disorder. Unsettled by this and unable to handle the added expense, I eventually stopped seeing her.

Why do mothers feel guilty when they have depression?

When depressed, a mother may unintentionally find herself feeling distracted or out of it and neglectful of the baby’s needs. The baby may lack supervision or environmental stimulation. Too often, women feel ashamed or guilty when they experience signs of depression.

Is there such thing as a depressed mom?

Though the media often depicts those with depression as loners, the truth is depression does not discriminate. It knows no restrictions and no bounds. I would know. I am a wife, mother, writer, runner, and “ depressed mom .” I have lived with this condition for more than 19 years.

The reality is, many mothers struggle with a degree of post-pregnancy blues, and one in five women experiences depression at some point in her life. Some mothers suffer from more severe, longer lasting symptoms of postpartum depression. This can result from hormonal changes or even traumatic birth experiences.

As a 35-year-old mom, I felt like I couldn’t pause my life while my depression played out. I started seeing a therapist bimonthly and met for four months. She suggested I pay more money to be tested for attention deficit disorder. Unsettled by this and unable to handle the added expense, I eventually stopped seeing her.

How are children affected by moms and depression?

Maggie, now the mother of five children ages 2 to 9, notices that her children easily pick up on—and tend to take on—her irritability. “It seems like my bad mood rubs off on them,” she says. “They start picking on each other, teasing and fighting over their toys or whose turn it is to watch a favorite television show.