Users' questions

Why do string trimmers need straight driveshafts?

Why do string trimmers need straight driveshafts?

Trimmers that have nylon or metal blades usually require straight driveshafts to handle the higher torque required to turn the heavier disk, and because of the shock loads that are passed back from the blade to the drive shaft and its gearbox (es).

When did George Ballas invent the string trimmer?

String trimmers are commonly used for cutting low foliage near obstacles or on steep or irregular terrain. The string trimmer was invented in the early-1970s by George Ballas of Houston, Texas, who conceived the idea while watching the revolving action of the cleaning brushes in an automatic car wash.

Why are monofilament lines used for string cutting?

Some monofilament lines designed for more powerful cutters have an extruded shape, like a star, that helps the line slash the material being cut; the line is thus able to cut quite large woody plants (small shrubs) or at least girdle them effectively. These lines make solid disks less necessary for tough jobs.

What kind of arrow shaft did Easton make?

In the 1970’s Easton created barreled X7 aluminum arrows, which were proven through testing to be superior to parallel shafts. Unfortunately the cost of producing a barreled aluminum shaft with a constant wall thickness and good tolerances proved to be too high for viable production.

Trimmers that have nylon or metal blades usually require straight driveshafts to handle the higher torque required to turn the heavier disk, and because of the shock loads that are passed back from the blade to the drive shaft and its gearbox (es).

String trimmers are commonly used for cutting low foliage near obstacles or on steep or irregular terrain. The string trimmer was invented in the early-1970s by George Ballas of Houston, Texas, who conceived the idea while watching the revolving action of the cleaning brushes in an automatic car wash.

Some monofilament lines designed for more powerful cutters have an extruded shape, like a star, that helps the line slash the material being cut; the line is thus able to cut quite large woody plants (small shrubs) or at least girdle them effectively. These lines make solid disks less necessary for tough jobs.

Why was the shape of an arrow shaft important?

Ancient archers knew that by tapering the rear of the shaft and maintaining a bigger diameter in the front of the shaft, the arrow had better performance. For one thing, the tapered shape slightly reduces drag while producing a higher front-of-center balance with equivalent overall weight.